Schedule

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Readings on the syllabus are required, Any readings under “reference” are optional (though they might be helpful in writing final papers/digital essays).

COURSE OUTLINE

Week 1: Course Overview and Introduction

1.14     Introduction to Course

Ling, Rich and Donner, Jonathan. (2009). Mobile Communication. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Chapter 1, p. 1-29

Find Rich Ling and Jonathan Donner on Twitter.

Watch: Jan Chipchase, The Anthropology of Mobile Phones TedTalk

Find Jan Chipchase on Twitter

Also review the Wikipedia entry on Mobile media.

Skim: Gross, Tal (2014, December 31) “This year I’m resolving to ban laptops from my classroom.” Washington Post.

 

1.20     *DUE: First assignment due EVERYONE (11pm)

 

Week 2: Mobile History

1.21     

Farman, Jason. (2012). “Historicizing Mobile Media: Locating Transformations of Embodied Space,” in N. Arceneaux & A. Kavoori (Eds), The Mobile Media Reader. New York: Peter Lang. P. 9-22.

Find Jason Farman on Twitter

Ling, Rich and Donner, Jonathan. (2009). Mobile Communication. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Chapter 2, p. 30-48.

Goggin, Gerard. (2006). Cell Phone Culture: Mobile technology in everyday life. London: Routledge. Chapter 2, 19-40.

Find Gerard Goggin on Twitter

Reference:

Marvin, Carolyn. (1988). When Old Technologies Were New. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Chapter 2

Hazlett, Thomas W. (2012). “A Brief History of U.S. Mobile Spectrum,” in N. Arceneaux & A. Kavoori (Eds), The Mobile Media Reader. New York: Peter Lang. P. 68-86.

Goggin, Gerard. (2006). Cell Phone Culture: Mobile technology in everyday life. London: Routledge. Chapter 4, 66-88.

 

Week 3: Augment Reality

Guest Lecture: Professor Tony Liao, Temple University

1.28     

Mann, Steve. (2013, March 1). Steve Mann: My ‘Augmediated’ Life, What I’ve learned from 35 years of wearing computerized eyewear.” IEEE Spectrum.

Liao, Tony & Humphreys, Lee. (2014). Layar-ed Places: Using Mobile Augmented Reality to Tactically Re-Engage, Re-Produce, and Re-Appropriate Public Space. New Media & Society.

 

2.1           *Due: Digital Essay #1, 11pm  (comments due 2/3, 11pm) 

 

Week 4: Social Justice and Doing Research

Guest Speaker: Kristina DeVoe, Temple University Comm/English Librarian

2.4 IN LAB TUCC 410

Light, Ann and Rosemary Luckin. (2008). “Designing for Social Justice: People, Technology and Learning.” Report for Futurelab.

Read about and explore the following apps:

Rice Globe: app, video

Buycott: apparticle

AXS Map: app, article

Climate Defense: app, article

Endgame: Syria: app, article

Exceptional Voice App (EVA): app, article

Not your baby: apparticlearticle

FlyRights: apparticle

Election Protection: apparticle

Help the Homeless app: app, article

STOP!T: app, article

Reference:

Flueckiger, Barbara. (2012). “The iPhone Apps: A Digital Culture of Interactivity.” In Snickars, P. and Vonderau, P. (Eds). Moving Data: The iPhone and the future of media. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 171-183.

Tamminen, Sakari, Oulasvirta, Annti, Toiskallio, Kalle, & Kankainen, Anu. (2004). Understanding mobile contexts. Personal Ubiquitous Computing, 8, 135-143.

Ling, Rich and Donner, Jonathan. (2009). Mobile Communication. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Chapters 3 and 4, p. 49-106

Goggin, Gerard. (2006). Cell Phone Culture: Mobile technology in everyday life. London: Routledge. Chapter 3, 41-62.

  

Week 5: Human-centered design: considering the motivations, emotions, and social lives of humans when designing

Guest Speaker: Professor Gabriela Marcu, Drexel University

2.11

Marcu, Gabriela, Bardram, Jakob, and Gabrielli, Silvia. (2011) A Framework for Overcoming Challenges in Designing Persuasive Monitoring and Feedback Systems for Mental Illness. Presented at the 5th International Conference on Pervasive Computing Technologies for Healthcare (PervasiveHealth) and Workshops.

Marcu, Gabriela, Dey, Anind K., and Kiesler, Sara. (2012) Parent-Driven Use of Wearable Cameras for Autism Support: A field study with families. Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing. Pages 401-410

Bently, Frank and Edward Barrett. (2012). Building Mobile Experiences. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pages 53-67, 83-107.

 

2.15       *Due: Final project social justice research report, 11pm

  

Week 6: Surveillance and Sousveillance

2.18 

Mann, Steve. (2013, September 26). “MannGlass, SpeedGlass, GOOGlass, and “The Veillance Contract.”

Marwick, Alice. (2012). “Public Domain: Surveillance in everyday life.” Surveillance & Society. 9(4): 378-393.

Denvir, Daniel. (2013, March 7). “Police Brutality in the iPhone era.”

Fung, Brian. (2014, June 3). “How hard should it be for cops to track your location?” Washington Post.

Reference:

Chapter 11 (142-163) from Lessig, Lawerence. (1999). Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace. New York: Basic Books.

 

2.22        *Due: Final project application/technology concept  

 

Week 7: Accessibility and App Workshop 

2.25 IN LAB TUCC 410

We’ll be using the MIT App Inventor, check out the website for details

Goggin, Gerard. (2006). Cell Phone Culture: Mobile technology in everyday life. London: Routledge. Chapter 5, p. 89-103.

Donner, Jonathan. (2008). “Shrinking Fourth World?” In Katz, J. E. (Ed.). Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. P. 29-42

Chipchase, Jan. (2008). “Reducing Illiteracy as a Barrier to Mobile Communication.” In Katz, J. E. (Ed.). Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. P. 79-89

Top 15 iPhone Apps for People with Physical Challenges” (2010, November 8) in Silver Cross.

Soederquist. (2012). “Why mobile Web accessibility matters- best practices to make your mobile site accessible” from mobiForge.

Reference:

Cell Phone Accessibility Overview.” American Foundation for the Blind

Mobile Accessibility Guidelines and Resources

Garland Thomson, Rosemarie. (1996). “Introduction: From Wonder to Error- A genealogy of freak discourse in modernity.” In R. Garland Thomson (Ed.) Freakery: Cultural spectacles of the extraordinary body. New York: NYU Press. P. 1-19.

Snyder, Sharon L. and David T. Mitchel. (2001). “Re-engaging the Body: Disability studies and the resistance to embodiment.” Public Culture 13(3): 367-389.

 

Week 8: SPRING BREAK

 

3.8           *Due: Digital Essay #2, 11pm (comments due 3/10, 11pm)

 

Week 9: Mobility

3.11

Goggin, Gerard and Hamilton, Caroline. (2012). “Reading After the Phone: E-reader and mobile media,” in N. Arceneaux & A. Kavoori (Eds), The Mobile Media Reader. New York: Peter Lang. p. 102-119

Kakihara, Masao & Sorensen, Carsten. (2001). Expanding the ‘Mobility’ Concept. SIGGROUP Bulletin, 22(3), 33-37.

Gazzard, Alison. (2011). “Location, location, location: collecting space and place in mobile media.” Convergence. 17(4): p. 405-417

Find Allie Gazzard on Twitter.

Reference:

Urry, J. (2002). “Mobility and proximity.” Sociology, 36(2), 255-274

Tamminen, Sakari, Oulasvirta, Annti, Toiskallio, Kalle, & Kankainen, Anu. (2004). “Understanding mobile contexts.” Personal Ubiquitous Computing, 8, 135-143.

Goggin, Gerard. (2012). “Reading (with) the iPhone.” In In Snickars, P. and Vonderau, P. (Eds). Moving Data: The iPhone and the future of media. New York: Columbia University Press. p. 195-210.

Week 10:  Social Interaction

3.18

Clark, Lynn Schofield. (2013) The Parent App: Understanding Families in the Digital Age. London: Oxford University Press. Chapter 9.

Turkle, Sherry. (2008). “Always-On/Always-On-You: The Tethered Self.” In Katz, J. E. (Ed.). Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. P. 121-137.

Find Sherry Turkle on Twitter.

Humphreys, Lee. (2012). “Connecting, Coordinating, Cataloguing: Communicative Practices on Mobile Social Networks,” Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media, 56:4, 494-510

Learn more about Lee Humphreys here.

Reference:

Ling, Rich and Donner, Jonathan. (2009). Mobile Communication. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Chapter 5. P. 107-133

 

Week 11: Mobile Politics

3.25

Rheingold, Howard. (2008). “Mobile Media and Political Collective Action.” In Katz, J. E. (Ed.). Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. P. 225-239.

Find Howard Rheingold on Twitter

Koivunen, Anu. (2012). “Party Apps and Other Citizenship Calls.” Moving Data: The iPhone and the future of media. New York: Columbia University Press. P. 223-237.

Leistert, Oliver. (2012). “The iPhone’s Failure: Protests and Resistances.” Moving Data: The iPhone and the future of media. New York: Columbia University Press. P. 238-248.

Messieh, Nancy. (2011, June 2). “A Basic Mobile Apps Arsenal for Activists.” The Next Web.

Reference:

Global protest, technology and social media: Research roundup 

Ibahrine, Mohammad. (2008). “Mobile Communication and Sociopolitical Change in the Arab World.” In Katz, J. E. (Ed.). Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. P. 257-272

Penney, Joel and Dadas, Caroline. (2013). “(Re) Tweeting in the service of protest: Digital composition and circulation in the Occupy Wall Street Movement.” New Media and Society. Published OnlineFirst: March 15: http://nms.sagepub.com/content/early/2013/03/13/1461444813479593.full.pdf+html

3.29    *Due: Final project theory and design assignment, 11pm

Week 12: Mobile Games

4.1     

Katz, James. E and Acord, Sophia Krzys. (2008). “Mobile Games and Entertainment.” In Katz, J. E. (Ed.). Handbook of Mobile Communication Studies. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. P. 403-418.

Chan, Dean. (2008). “Convergence, Connectivity, and the Case of Japanese Mobile Gaming.” Games and Culture. 3(1): P. 13-25.

Shaw, Adrienne. (2012). “How do you say gamer in Hindi: Exploratory research on the Indian digital game industry and culture.” In Huntemann, N. and Aslinger, B. (Eds.). Gaming Globally: Production, Play, Place. New York: Palgrave. P. 226-250.

Consalvo, Mia. (2012). “Slingshot to Victory: Games, Play and the iPhone.” In Snickars, P. and Vonderau, P. (Eds). Moving Data: The iPhone and the future of media. New York: Columbia University Press. P. 184-194.

Find Mia Consalvo on Twitter

Reference:

Hjorth, Larissa. (2011). Mobile@ game cultures: the place of urban mobile gaming. Convergence. 17(4): p. 357-371.

Parikka, Jussi and Suominen, Jaakko. (2006). “Victorian Snakes? Towards A Cultural History of Mobiles Games and the Experience of Movement.” Game Studies. 6 (1):

McCrea, Christian. (2011). “We play in public: The nature and context of portable gaming systems.” Convergence. 17(4): P. 389-403.

 

4.5   *Due: Digital Essay #3, 11pm (comments due 4/7, 11pm)

 

Week 13: Mobile Journalism

 4.8

Snowden, Collette. (2012). “As It Happens: Mobile communications technology, journalism, and breaking news,” in N. Arceneaux & A. Kavoori (Eds), The Mobile Media Reader. New York: Peter Lang. P. 120-134.

Goggin, Gerard. (2006). Cell Phone Culture: Mobile technology in everyday life. London: Routledge. Chapter 8, 143-161.

 

Week 14: Prototype Workshop

4.15 IN LAB TUCC 410  Meeting in regular classroom

Due: Draft prototype of final project

If your prototype is digital, be sure to bring a laptop.

Review: Bently, Frank and Edward Barrett. (2012). Building Mobile Experiences. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Pages 53-67, 83-107.

 

Week 15: Final Project Presentations

4.22 IN LAB TUCC 410  Meeting in regular classroom

Due: Presentation of final project

If you are using powerpoint, prezi, etc. submit these to me via email before class so I can queue them up.

5.1     *Due: Completed final projects, 5pm

  • Papers via email
  • Prototypes:
    • Deliver to MSP Main Office if it is a physical object
    • Submit via email if it is a digital object

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